Perfectly Seared Tuna

It’s not very often that we cook tuna, but every time we do, I always fall back in love with the giant fish and wonder “why don’t we do this more often.” One, it’s delicious; two, it’s easy; three, is good for you and when it’s purchased from a reliable source, you can rest assured that you’re getting a sustainably caught product. Which is of utmost importance, always. Oh, and four, leftovers make for a killer salad niçoise … and yes, I know it’s traditionally made with anchovies but tuna works perfectly too.

To be completely honest, I don’t eat much that’s not vegan. And I follow a plant-based diet most of the time, but when Gastro Gabe wants to cook tuna, it’s hard to say “no” because he does so perfectly. Here’s how:

First, start with a great piece of fish. Look for tuna steaks with a deep, mahogany red color, no indentations. The flesh should appear bright and clear, even though it’s a deep red.

Ahi is the Hawaiian name for yellowfin tuna

Drizzle with EVOO, lots of cracked pepper, a touch of salt and lots and lots (and lots) of chopped garlic. Place on a non-stick pan over high heat, for 5-minutes a side, flip only once. Note, most tuna steaks are 1-2 inches thick. You will need to adjust your cook time for anything thinner, or thicker. AND if you prefer your tuna slightly rare in the middle, reduce the time per side to 3 minutes or until it reaches the consistency you prefer. I personally like mine cooked through, but definitely not overcooked. Serve with more pepper, and whatever sides float your boat. For this meal, we did asparagus and wild rice on the side. Oh, and don’t forget the chardonnay ; ) Enjoy!

DISCLAIMER: Our recipes are just that, ours. Some are modified versions of dishes we’ve had elsewhere or old-favorites that contained animal proteins, while others are a concentrated effort of trial and error. But all are intended to be altered by you and made to suit your tastes. So if you want more garlic or none at all, go for it. You do you ; )

Rethinking Tuna

Think you know tuna? Here’s a short guide on what you should eat, and what you should not.

Steamed Mussels

A plant-based diet can and does (sometimes) include foods that aren’t plants

On Being a Flexitarian

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